Poster Sessions and Demonstrations


Poster Sessions are on this page


Go to Tuesday Concurrent Sessions

Go to Wednesday Concurrent sessions

Poster Sessions & Demonstrations
Refreshment Break
Wednesday, July 19 2:40-3:40 pm


ZHENG MANQING (CHENG MAN-CH'ING) AND HIS INNOVATIONS IN TAIJIQUAN PEDAGOGY

Barbara Davis

Abstract
One of the leading figures of late twentieth-century taijiquan, Zheng Manqing made a number of important contributions to the spread of taijiquan. In this poster session, I focus on Zheng's pedagogical innovations: changes in teaching formats, curriculum, creation of a shortened form, and his use of what were then cutting-edge instructional technologies of film and video. I give particular attention to how he bridged cultural gaps when he began teaching in the United States in the 1960s after having taught in the Chinese mainland and Taiwan for several decades.

Barbara Davis
(MA East Asian Studies, University of Minnesota), is author of The Taijiquan Classics: An Annotated Translation (North Atlantic Books 2004), and translator of Chen Weiming's Taiji Sword (North Atlantic Books, 2000). She is editor of Taijiquan Journal and is at work on a study of Zheng Manqing's life. Her prior work, "In Search of a Unified Dao: Zheng Manqing's Life and Contributions to Taijiquan" was published in the Journal of Asian Martial Arts 5/2 (1996). She is director of Great River T'ai Chi Ch'uan in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, and is an associate editor of the Journal of Asian Martial Arts.


HEALTH BENEFITS OF T’AI CHI: RESEARCH AND CLINICAL EVIDENCE

David X. Swenson and David Longsdorf
The College of St. Scholastica and Superior Martial Arts, Superior, WI

Abstract

T’ai chi has been used for generations as a form of healing and health promotion in China. However, rigorous research on the benefits of practice has been lacking until recent years. Studies have appeared in professional journals in sports medicine, physical therapy, exercise physiology, nursing, gerontology, and psychology that provide information on applications of t’ai chi. This poster presentation will provide an overview of the empirical evidence for its benefits. Several physiological processes and structures are involved in practice, and changes have been monitored in cardiovascular, motor coordination and balance, and immune systems. A variety of physiological and psychological disorders have been shown to respond favorably to practice. However, there are also several conditions that may be complicated by or respond adversely to practice, and cautions and contraindications will be reviewed.

David X. Swenson PhD
Forensic Psychologist and Associate Professor of Management, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN. Professor Swenson has been a student and teacher of t’ai chi for 40 years, a student of T. T. Liang and Jou Tsung Hwa.

David Longsdorf MA is a 10-year student and teacher of t’ai chi, and psychotherapist who uses t’ai chi in practice. He is the Sifu of Superior Martial Arts in Superior, WI., and has conducted research with Dr. Swenson for five years on the physiological and psychological benefits of practice.


top of page

CHINESE CALLIGRAPHY
Jiang Jian-ye

Shifu Jianye Jiang was born in 1950 and has studied Wushu from the age of 5, learning from well-known masters such as Yu Mingwei, Yu Hai and many others. He received BA and master's degrees from Qufu University and Shanghai Physical Education Institute. A national and international judge in China and the U.S., he is also a master calligrapher and winner of national and international awards. Sales of his calligraphy have garnered more than $10,000, all donated to the Shandong Disabled Association. He has also acted in movies produced in China, Australia, and Japan.


top of page
MY LIFE IS MY ART: LIVED EXPERIENCES OF OLDER ADULTS PRACTICING TAIJI (T’AI CHI) AND QIGONG (CH’I KUNG)
Yang, Y., DeCelle, S., Reed, M., Rosengren, K., Schlagal, R., Greene, J.

Presenter: Yang Yang, Director, Center for Taiji Studies
Visiting Professor of Kinesiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Purpose: This study investigated the multi-dimensional effects of a six-month Taiji/Qigong traditional curriculum intervention with older adults, in order to enrich our understanding of the character and extent of benefits of the intervention, and to construct a model useful for describing and understanding the meanings respondents attributed to their experience with Taiji.

Dr. Yang Yang: With both Law and Engineering degrees earned in China, Master Yang practiced business law for several years before coming to the United States to study for a Master's Degree in Economics at Illinois State University. He has recently completed a Doctorate Degree in Kinesiology at the University of Illinois, where his research focuses directly on the benefits and mechanisms of Taiji and Qigong practice. He is currently a visiting professor at the University of Illinois and the Director of the Center for Taiji Studies.
THE EFFECT OF A 6 MONTH TAIJI (T’AI CHI) AND QIGONG (CH’I KUNG) INTERVENTION ON OLDER ADULTS’ LOWER BODY STRENGTH AND BALANCE BEHAVIORS

Yang, Y., Verkuilen, J., Grubisich, S. Reed, M., Rosengren, K.

Presenter: Yang Yang, Director, Center for Taiji Studies
Visiting Professor of Kinesiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Background: The author’s objectives were to determine the effect of a 6 month Taiji and Qigong (TQ) intervention on healthy older adults’ balance and lower body strength, and to explore mechanisms for improvements in balance and stability afforded by TQ training.

Dr. Yang Yang (See previous poster)
top of page

Go to Tuesday Concurrent Sessions

Go to Wednesday Concurrent sessions